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  • Young Finnish men neglecting dental health

    Young Finnish men neglecting dental health

    Research carried out amongst Finnish conscripts reveals that almost half have at least one cavity in need of dental treatment. Smoking and the use of snuff also appear to be on the rise comparative to earlier studies.

    Young men are not taking care of their teeth, according to a licentiate study presented in Oulu on Wednesday. Furthermore, the research shows that previous positive progress on oral health has stalled.

    Clinical research was carried out on around 13,500 conscripts who entered military service in 2011. Nearly half of the young servicemen had at least one dental cavity that required professional dental treatment.

    Tooth decay is influenced by general health habits, socio-economic factors and the conscript’s place of residence.

    Almost half smoke daily

    According to the research, young men are also using snuff and tobacco more than they used to. Amongst conscripts 40 percent smoked daily and nearly 20 percent used snuff occasionally or on a daily basis.

    The oral health of smokers was clearly worse than that of non-smokers. However, snuff users appeared no worse off than those who did not use any tobacco products.

    The research was conducted as part of Tarja Tanner’s Licentiate in Dentistry, which was examined at the University of Oulu on Wednesday.

     

    Source:

    http://yle.fi/uutiset/young_finnish_men_neglecting_dental_health/8238472

  • Her children refuse to brush their teeth!

     

    Every evening as I get my two year old son Felix ready for bed he will look at me reproachfully – and then run away. I chase after him with pleas and bribes, before resorting to threats about what will happen should he refuse to do as I say. When that, too, fails, I corner him in a headlock, prise his mouth open and force his toothbrush inside. Afterwards there are cross words and tearful recriminations – from me as well as my toddler.

    I have always found cleaning my children’s teeth an emotionally-charged nightmare – as do millions of other parents. A report last month found that 42 per cent of parents have to force their children (aged up to 11) to brush their teeth, with 80 per cent of youngsters throwing temper tantrums as they do so. Only a quarter of the 1558 parents surveyed by Aquafresh believe their children are brushing their teeth properly and one in 10 are so demoralised by the process they send their offspring to bed without cleaning them at all.

    But our acquiescence comes at a cost. A national dental health survey published in May revealed almost half of eight-year-olds have signs of decay in their milk teeth, while a recent report by the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) found that tooth decay was the most common reason five to nine year olds were admitted to hospital. Nearly 26,000 children in that age group were admitted in 2013-14, an increase of 14 per cent from 2011.

    Professor Nigel Hunt, Dean of the Royal College of Surgeon’s dental faculty, says the state of our children’s teeth has reached “crisis point” adding that“ it is absolutely intolerable that in this day and age, in a civilised country, children are having so many teeth out for decay, which is over 90 per cent preventable.”

    Sugary treats and drinks – cheaper and more readily available than ever – cause decay by reacting with bacteria in the mouth to produce acid that weakens tooth enamel . Prof Hunt has called for the amount of sugar in food and drink to be better labelled, and last month Tesco took the unprecedented step of banning some of its most popular sugar laden drinks – including Ribena and Capri-Sun – from its supermarket aisles – ostensibly to tackle childhood obesity but presumably the company is aware of their effects on children’s teeth too.

    But substandard brushing and infrequent dentist visits are also to blame for rising child tooth decay – and I am complicit in all three. I find it hard to resist Felix and his four-year-old sister Rosie’s incessant demands for sweet treats and our fraught tooth brushing sessions usually fall short of the NHS recommended twice daily two minutes. And shamefully, until very recently I had yet to take either child to the dentist. A fear of how they would react was the deterrent. With every passing month I grew more worried that my neglect would lead to lasting dental problems, and retreat further into denial.

    However, the spate of news stories on the state of our children’s teeth jolted me into action, and so it was that one day last month, Rosie and Felix were sitting in my dentist’s reception awaiting their first check-up. I tried to build enthusiasm for the visit, but both were nervous. “Are you scared of the dentist, too, Mummy?” asked Rosie, and although I didn’t admit as much to my daughter, my own fear has almost certainly exacerbated my children’s reluctance. Indeed, research by a US dental insurance company found that over a third of kids were frightened of the dentist and that this was often a learned behaviour, picked up from parents.

    Problems with my own teeth have also left me distrustful of NHS dentistry – which I feel has failed me – so I took my children to my dentist, Dr Mervyn Druian, who runs a private practice in North London. Dr Druian encourages parents to bring their children in from the age of two. “As long as parents are brushing their baby’s teeth, I can’t see the point of bringing them to the dentist any younger” he says. “It’s unnecessary until they have grown around 75 per cent of teeth.”

    Girl getting her teeth examined Antonia Hoyle with her children Rosie and Felix who hate brushing their teeth

    But, he warns: “Many parents mistakenly believe that milk teeth don’t matter because they are going to fall out anyway. But they act as ‘space maintainers’ for the permanent teeth that replace them. If a decaying milk tooth has to be removed the ‘wrong’ tooth may come forward in its place.”

    After a few minutes of the children riding up and down in Dr Druian’s chair, Rosie was relaxed enough to have her check-up. On the pretence of “counting her teeth” Dr Druian used a hand-held mirror to inspect her molars as Felix looked on. It took a matter of minutes and afterwards Dr Druian told a delighted Rosie (and her mum) that her teeth were “absolutely fine.”

    Felix, however, had by this time hidden in the corner of the room and was resolutely refusing to open his mouth. Dr Druian was reluctant to force him but after bribes of Spiderman stickers Felix eventually permitted a brief flash of his bottom front teeth, during which , eventually causing tooth decay.

    My heart sank but he told me: “It is unlikely to have led to damage at this stage. I sometimes give children a scale and polish to get rid of it,but because this is his first visit it would be too overwhelming for him.”

    We arranged another appointment for six months’ time, in the hope Felix would be more compliant then.

    If his junior patients need extensive dental work, Dr Druian sends them to specialist children’s dentist (also in private practice) Jeremy Kaufman who is experienced in performing fillings on children as young as two. I asked Dr Kaufman how I can make brushing my children’s teeth less traumatic. “Use star charts, bribery and begging – all the strategies to get a child to do something they didn’t want to,” he advised. “Try and make it fun – let your children choose their toothbrush. Let them use an electric tooth brush if they want. Stand behind them with your hand under their face and give them a cuddle as you clean their teeth. Allow them to start brushing if they want to, before you carry on.” While child-friendly toothpastes like strawberry are also available although somewhat bizarrely, my kids like them even less than the standard mint.

    The evening after our visit to the dentist – chastened by the plaque developing on my son’s teeth – I was determined to embark on an adequate cleaning session. Rosie – enthused by the princess-decorated toothbrush Dr Druian had given her, managed to endure a full two minutes. Felix, alas, ran away before I resorted yet again to the headlock technique. But he insisted on taking his new pirate toothbrush to bed and his last words before falling asleep were “I go to the dentist again soon.” I live in hope.

     

    Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/mother-tongue/11785186/My-children-refuse-to-brush-their-teeth.html

  • Why a bedtime glass of milk can ruin your child’s teeth: The lactose in it is a type of sugar and can be harmful at night

    Angela Debley took her son Fin, then eight, to the dentist for a check-up, confident that he’d be given the all-clear.

    After all, Angela, an admin manager from Bracknell, Berkshire, was a self-confessed ‘health freak’ who was always careful to give her two sons, Fin and Joe, then three, a nutritious diet. She was also meticulous about their dental hygiene.

    ‘I avoided giving them sweets in favour of what I believed was an extremely good diet full of natural foods,’ says Angela, 40.

    ‘Instead of fizzy drinks, chocolate and crisps, the kids would have pure fruit juice, muesli bars and granola with natural yoghurt and honey. They also brushed their teeth morning and night.’

    When the dentist broke the news that Fin had two cavities in his milk teeth, which had developed since his last appointment six months before, Angela says she ‘felt like the worst parent in the world’ – but she couldn’t work out where she’d gone wrong.

    ‘The dentist seemed to assume I was feeding him junk food and sweets, which was upsetting because we ate well.’

    In fact, it was her children’s healthy diet – and particularly their snacking habits – that had caused the damage.

    Angela later learned it wasn’t just the quantity of sugar that was the problem, but the frequency with which teeth are exposed to it. ‘By offering juice, fruit and honey between meals, I was bathing my sons’ teeth in sugar and acid.’

    As Professor Damien Walmsley, scientific adviser to the British Dental Association, explains: ‘Children today snack far more often than previous generations, which leaves teeth under constant attack.’

    Last month, a Royal College of Surgeons report revealed that one-third of five-year-olds in England suffer from tooth decay, and it is now the leading cause of hospital admissions for under-nines.

    The report, The State Of Children’s Oral Health, found that every year 46,000 children were admitted to hospital for multiple tooth extractions – almost 26,000 of those aged between five and nine.

    Professor Nigel Hunt, of the Royal College of Surgeons, blamed sugary foods and drinks, saying these should carry cigarette-style warning pictures to highlight the risk to children’s teeth.

    But the problem is certainly not confined to children brought up on junk food, or who aren’t taken to the dentist regularly. In fact, dentists say they are seeing more and more children from middle-class homes whose health-obsessed parents are inadvertently harming their teeth.

    Dr Rhona Eskander, of the private Chelsea Dental Clinic, says parents are horrified to discover that they have caused their children’s dental decay.

    ‘Sometimes sporty children may be given unnecessary sports drinks, which are high in sugar and acids that damage teeth,’ she says. ‘Health-conscious parents also like yoghurt drinks – but these “healthy drinks” usually contain high levels of hidden sugars.’

    And while a favourite ‘virtuous’ snack is the muesli bar, some cereal bars have twice the levels of sugar as a similar-sized chocolate bar.

    There are two ways in which these kinds of foods damage teeth. One is acid erosion, which occurs when teeth are exposed to acidic foods such as fruit and juice. Dried fruit such as raisins may cause acid erosion, too.

    Bacteria that live in the mouth cause decay, because as they feed off sugars they excrete an acid that attacks enamel in a similar way to acid erosion

    Tooth enamel begins to soften and be destroyed when acid levels in the mouth drop below 5.5 on the pH scale. (Water has a pH of 7, oranges have between 3 and 4.)

    After 30 minutes to an hour, saliva, which is alkaline, will restore natural pH balance in the mouth and the enamel will harden, but if the exposure to acid is too frequent – as caused by constant snacking – then the enamel begins to wear away.

    This not only makes teeth more vulnerable to decay, but if teeth are brushed within 30 minutes of acid exposure, the softened enamel can be literally scrubbed off.

    ‘As children’s milk teeth have thinner and softer enamel, they are particularly at risk,’ says Dr Hanel Nathwani, of Reading Smiles in Berkshire. The second major threat is sugar. As Professor Walmsley explains: ‘Bacteria that live in the mouth cause decay, because as they feed off sugars they excrete an acid that attacks enamel in a similar way to acid erosion.’

    These bacteria love refined sugar most, but they also feed on honey, and even processed starchy foods such as bread.

    ‘Acid attacks can last for up to an hour, but teeth can recover provided you limit the sugary foods and drinks to mealtimes only,’ says Professor Walmsley.

    Even if it’s only the milk teeth that are affected, this can still lead to long-term problems.

    Angela used to give her sons muesli bars as an after-school snack

    ‘If children have to have milk teeth removed, teeth start to shift to fill the space, so their second teeth can’t grow into their natural position,’ says Dr Nathwani. ‘This can affect the alignment of their teeth, and mean the child is more likely to need braces.’

    He adds: ‘I often see parents who feed their families generally great diets and are very shocked when they learn that their children have tooth decay because of these apparently healthy foods.

    ‘I feel for them, as they are trying their best to do the right thing.’

    This rang true for Angela. Fin and Joe would have four or more snacks a day, such as granola and honey mid-morning, milk at night, plus juice and fruit whenever they wanted it during the day.

    She used to give her sons muesli bars as an after-school snack.

    ‘I thought they were a healthy alternative to sweets and biscuits, but after I moved the family to Dr Nathwani’s practice, I looked more closely at the labels and noticed they were packed with more sugar than a chocolate bar.’

    Angela gave the children milk before bed, thinking the calcium would be good for their teeth. However, Dr Nathwani says: ‘While milk during the day is fine, the lactose in it is a type of sugar and can be harmful at night, as when we are asleep we produce less of the saliva that would neutralise it

    Angela is far from the only health-conscious parent to discover she’s unwittingly exposed her child to tooth decay.

    Louise Jones (a pseudonym, as she’s too embarrassed to give her real name) discovered her ‘fruit monster’ son needed four fillings at the age of seven because he constantly snacked on oranges, grapes and apples.

    ‘My family call me the “fridge Nazi” at home, because I’m so careful with my children’s diet,’ she says. ‘I was very proud that he loved fruit so much.

    ‘I was horrified when his dentist told me that my son had such bad teeth because constant exposure to acid in fruit was literally dissolving the enamel on his teeth. I now give fruit at mealtimes and just once a day as a snack.’

    The fad for smoothies doesn’t help, as Dr Uchenna Okoye, of London Smiling dental practice warns. ‘Juice from fruits has a high acid content and can damage the enamel of your teeth in exactly the same way as fizzy drinks do.’

     

     

    Source:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3192993/A-bedtime-glass-milk-ruin-child-s-teeth-lactose-type-sugar-harmful-night.html

  • Study finds dental implants result in better quality of life for osteoporotic women

    With age, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are at greater risk of losing their teeth. But what treatment for tooth loss provides women with the highest degree of satisfaction in their work and social lives?

    A new study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers suggests dental implants may be the best route to take, according to Leena Palomo, associate professor of periodontics and corresponding author of “Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women.”

    Their findings were reported in the Journal of International Dentistry . The research is part of a series of studies analyzing dental outcomes for with osteoporosis.

    In one of the first studies to examine quality of life after treatment to replace missing in osteoporotic women, the researchers surveyed 237 women about their with replacement teeth and how it improved their lives at work and in social situations. The 23-question survey rated satisfaction with their work, health, emotional and sexual aspects of their lives.

    Participants were from the Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Wellness Collaboration, which is part of a database of health information about 900 women with osteoporosis.

    Osteoporotic women with one or more adjacent teeth missing (excluding or third molars) were chosen for the study. The women had restoration work done that included implants (64 women), fixed partial denture, which is a false tooth cemented to crowns of two teeth (60), a removal denture, better known as false teeth (47), or had no restoration work done (66).

    Women with dental implants reported a higher overall satisfaction with their lives, said Christine DeBaz, a third-year Case Western Reserve dental student. She was lead researcher on the project and personally interviewed each participant.

    Fixed dentures scored next highest in satisfaction, followed by false teeth and, finally, women with no .

    Women with also reported the highest satisfaction in emotional and sexual areas, while those without restorations scored the lowest in those two areas.

    As health professions move to a patient-centered form of delivering dental service, understanding the patient’s outcomes for satisfaction of the treatment’s esthetics is as important as chewing function, DeBaz said.

    “We need hard data to drive our decision-making about which is best for the patient,” Palomo said.With age, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are at greater risk of losing their teeth. But what treatment for tooth loss provides women with the highest degree of satisfaction in their work and social lives?

    A new study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers suggests dental implants may be the best route to take, according to Leena Palomo, associate professor of periodontics and corresponding author of “Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women.”

    Their findings were reported in the Journal of International Dentistry . The research is part of a series of studies analyzing dental outcomes for with osteoporosis.

    In one of the first studies to examine quality of life after treatment to replace missing in osteoporotic women, the researchers surveyed 237 women about their with replacement teeth and how it improved their lives at work and in social situations. The 23-question survey rated satisfaction with their work, health, emotional and sexual aspects of their lives.

    Participants were from the Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Wellness Collaboration, which is part of a database of health information about 900 women with osteoporosis.

    Osteoporotic women with one or more adjacent teeth missing (excluding or third molars) were chosen for the study. The women had restoration work done that included implants (64 women), fixed partial denture, which is a false tooth cemented to crowns of two teeth (60), a removal denture, better known as false teeth (47), or had no restoration work done (66).

    Women with dental implants reported a higher overall satisfaction with their lives, said Christine DeBaz, a third-year Case Western Reserve dental student. She was lead researcher on the project and personally interviewed each participant.

    Fixed dentures scored next highest in satisfaction, followed by false teeth and, finally, women with no .

    Women with also reported the highest satisfaction in emotional and sexual areas, while those without restorations scored the lowest in those two areas.

    As health professions move to a patient-centered form of delivering dental service, understanding the patient’s outcomes for satisfaction of the treatment’s esthetics is as important as chewing function, DeBaz said.

    “We need hard data to drive our decision-making about which is best for the patient,” Palomo said.

  • An Overview of Dental Bonding

    Do you suffer from chipped or gapped teeth? This video explains how a dentist serving New York City can help you have a more beautiful smile.

    Modern cosmetic dentistry techniques can quickly and conveniently address many dental imperfections. Dental bonding in particular offers a fast and effective solution to common tooth flaws. This procedure involves the application of a resin that looks and feels like tooth enamel. This resin can remedy chips, discoloration, misshapen teeth, and a gapped smile. In many cases, a cosmetic dentist can eliminate these problems in a single dentist office visit. So to enjoy a stunning smile, talk to a cosmetic dentist about getting dental bonding.