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  • 5 ways you’re destroying your teeth!

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) – Taking care of your teeth is about preventative maintenance, but you may be doing things every day that are ruining your pearly whites.

    Here are five surprising ways you’re destroying your teeth from Women’s Health Magazine:

    1) Not visiting the dentist

    Think of your mouth as a machine. You’ve got to keep it running smoothly, so every once in a while you need a professional to take a look at it. Remember to schedule an appointment at least once a year.

    2) For-going brushing and flossing

    When certain bacteria sit on your teeth for long enough, they start colonizing and produce acid that can break down your teeth. Brushing helps remove the plaque before the colonies can start to cause damage, and flossing helps ensure you get what the brush can’t reach.

    3) Picking a non-fluoride toothpaste

    Fluoride is important because it helps replace the minerals worn away by bacteria-produced acid. It can help repair the teeth even after bacteria has damaged them.

    4) Chewing ice

    Subjecting your teeth to big ranges of hot and cold, which tends to make things expand and contract, eventually puts little micro-cracks in your enamel. Those little cracks in your teeth can build up, and one day, a piece might just break off.

    5) Sipping a sugary drink all day

    If you have a several cokes a day, you’re putting your teeth at risk. But, if you can’t kick the habit, at least rinse your mouth out with water to remove some of the sugar from your teeth.

     

    http://www.thv11.com/

  • Oregon kids starting school will be required to have dental screenings

    Oregon children who are starting public school and are 7 years old or younger will be required to have dental screenings, or show proof they’ve had one, under legislation signed by Gov. Kate Brown.

    Starting with the 2016-17 school year, new students will have to submit certification that they have received a screening within the previous 12 months from a licensed dentist or dental hygienist, or from a school employee qualified to spot dental problems. The certification must be submitted within 120 days of the student’s first day for him or her to remain enrolled, said Ely Sanders, school health specialist for the Oregon Department of Education.

    State Rep. Cedric Hayden , R-Roseburg, a dentist who was the chief sponsor of House Bill 2972 , said it will have little impact on children who already receive regular dental care. “This is designed to capture children that don’t have that opportunity,” he said.

    Hayden and Sanders said the bill has two goals: identifying children who have cavities, abscesses or other dental problems that may cause them to miss school, and raising parents’ awareness of the importance of oral health. Parents of children who are screened at school will be notified of the results and informed about followup and preventive care.

    The school screenings won’t be full dental exams. Instead, they’ll consist of “a quick look in the mouth with a mirror and a bright light,” said Dr. Bruce Austin, the state’s new dental director, who will implement the law.

    Under discussion now is who will do the school screenings. “Doing a screening inside somebody’s mouth requires a certain amount of dental knowledge,” Austin said.

    School nurses had criticized the bill, saying they didn’t feel they had sufficient training to detect dental problems. They also raised concerns that dental screenings would reduce the time they could spend on other health issues.

    Hayden said the new law will not require school nurses to do the screenings. Sanders said other school staff could be trained, or schools could work with local nonprofits.

    HB 2972 will also require school districts to report to the state annually on the percentage of their students who did not submit dental certification. The bill has an estimated fiscal impact of about $16,500 for that recordkeeping, Hayden said.

    Hayden said that as with other school-based screenings, parents will have the opportunity to opt out based on philosophical beliefs.

    The Oregon Dental Association has said the screening program will help prevent “needless pain and suffering” for many Oregon children and will help dentists target programs and services to the parts of the state where children have the most dental problems.

    “If we improve Oregonians’ oral health it’s going to improve our overall health,” Austin said.

     

    BY AMY WANG, www.oregonlive.com

  • 3D Printing is Revolutionizing Dentistry as Well!

    PITTSBURGH – Most people dread going to the dentist to get a crown on one of their teeth.

    The procedure can be long, tedious and often uncomfortable. Once in the chair, patients must bite down on a putty-like material – which can trigger the gag reflex – to create an impression of their teeth. Patients must wear temporary crowns for a few weeks until their permanent crowns have been made from the impressions, sometimes returning to the office for corrections if one falls out or is uncomfortable.

    Traditionally, crown fittings take three weeks and multiple visits to the dentist to complete. These permanent tooth-shaped “caps” – made of durable material such as steel, porcelain or ceramic – are put on to protect a weak tooth, restore a broken tooth, cover and support a tooth with a large filling or serve other uses.

    Fortunately, this slow process may soon be history in most dental offices. New 3-D video imaging technology is speeding up the time it takes for dentists to create lab-quality dental restorations – from weeks to a couple of hours.

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing – known as CAD/CAM technology – consists of a scanning wand no bigger than a large toothbrush and an on-site milling machine.

    The new system allows dentists to create and insert crowns, inlays, onlays and veneers in a single appointment. The scanning wand takes a 3-D image or video of a dental region in as little as 15 seconds.

    A block of a durable material such as lithium disilicate is then milled into shape and baked before it is inserted into the patient’s mouth.

    “There’s always the sense of amazement when patients experience (CAD/CAM technology) for the first time,” said Jeffery Verner, a dentist in Bethel Park. “I’ve even had some patients put the block in the machine themselves, and others call back afterward saying it was a cool experience.”

    Christine Trice, office manager for dentist Rick Rivardo in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, said the shorter time makes it easier for working people to better care for their teeth. Finding time in patients’ schedules for several appointments is the main reason treatment is delayed or even avoided, she said.

    Trice said because the new technology eliminates the need for putting in temporary crowns, there is also a reduced risk of irritation and increased tooth sensitivity.

    Despite these advantages, use of the new technology is not the standard in most dental practices, said Charles Sfeir, director of the Center for Craniofacial Regeneration at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. While the cost to patients does not change compared with the traditional approach, dental practices must pay about $100,000 for the equipment.

    Additional training is needed to operate the new devices, which may dissuade some older practitioners from adopting it, Trice said.

    Harve Dailey, 63, a retired chemist who has a rare nickel allergy, said the technology has spared him the severe gum irritation and bleeding he had with his old crowns. “This new procedure is much better from a patient point of view,” he said.

    Still, a growing number of dental practices in Allegheny County are making the investment.

    Meredith Fennell, a dentist in Chicora, Pennsylvania, has had the equipment for nearly two years, and Rivardo, the Monroeville dentist, introduced it recently. Pitt dental students have been getting training on the new equipment over the past few years, Sfeir said.

    “I don’t think a lot of people know about this,” he said. “We really are moving into the digital era and increasing convenience for patients.”

     

     

    Source:

    http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/life/d-imaging-changing-dentistry/article_ebd2afa1-ff99-5f7d-b859-0f3cd3869176.html

     

  • Find out more about a new form of “Relaxation Dentistry”

    SUMMARY: A relatively new practice has emerged to cater to individuals who experience anxiety when scheduling a dental appointment: relaxation dentistry.

    Posted: June 12, 2015

    The idea of going to the dentist may not exactly excite people, but for some, the thought of sitting in that chair can cause more than a normal amount of anxiety. In fact, dental phobia exists and, according to Harvard Health, 13 to 24 percent of people in the world have it. For these individuals, going to the dentist is terrifying. However, they, like everyone else, need regular oral care . A relatively new practice has emerged to cater to those who experience anxiety when scheduling a dental appointment: relaxation dentistry.

    What is relaxation dentistry?
    Relaxation dentistry (also called sedation dentistry) uses sedative methods to provide a calm atmosphere at the dentist. Patients may be given sedatives through an IV, but for those who don’t like the idea of being hooked up like that, needle-free methods are also available. In fact, oral sedation, in which patients receive medication through the mouth, is the most common practice.

    According to the Chicago Tribune, relaxation dentistry utilizes only the lowest dose of sedatives that a doctor can provide, while sedative dentistry may encompass more potent medication.

    “Sedation is a continuum,” Dr. Peter Tomaselli, dentist at Chicago Smile Design, told the source. “We stay very, very far to the conscious end of things and far away from the unconscious end of things.”

    The benefits of sedation
    Sedation dentistry appeals to people because it’s a seemingly quick experience. Patients note that they feel they’ve slept through the appointment or that the time spent at the dentist was much shorter than it actually was. The reality is that patients actually maintain consciousness, but the medication makes them feel sleepy or that time is passing quickly.

    This provides a variety of benefits. For starters, people who are afraid of going to the dentist are able to relax and speed through the process. Additionally, dentists can get more done. Usually, some procedures are broken up into several appointments. For instance, a patient who has multiple cavities may have to come in for each individual filling because they can’t sit through all the work at once. However, sedation dentistry enables doctors to perform all the necessary work in fewer appointments, as their patients are able to lay happily in the chair for longer periods of time.

    Perhaps the most beneficial aspect of sedation dentistry is that it helps patients get the routine oral care doctors recommend with relative ease. Those who put off appointments until something hurts can feel comfortable visiting their dentist every six months, preventing issues before they occur.

    Sedation regulations
    The Chicago Tribune also noted that sedation dentistry is heavily regulated to ensure the procedure is safe. Illinois dentists, for example, have to undergo 75 hours of supervised training before they can earn a permit to practice sedation dentistry.

    How to know if it’s right for you
    Only you can say whether sedation dentistry is a good fit. However, if you avoid going to the dentist because of anxiety, it may be worth the effort. Remember, routine oral care helps prevent major issues, so going to your dentist often can reduce the amount of big procedures you may have to have done.

    Source:

    http://www.therabreath.com/articles/news/oral-care-industry-news/what-is-relaxation-dentistry-36324.asp

  • Check out the DailyMails’s Secret to our strong teeth revealed: Nanostructures within dentine make pearly whites crack-resistant

    Human teeth have to serve a lifetime despite being subjected to acid, grinding and huge forces.

    But why teeth are so hardy hasn’t been understood until now.

    German scientists studying the structure of dentine – the layer beneath a tooth’s enamel – have found tiny nanostructures in it that stop teeth from cracking.

    A team of scientists led by Charite Julius-Wolff-Institute Berlin found mineral particles in dentine are pre-compressed so that internal stresses stop teeth cracking.

    It appears that nature uses internal stresses in a similar way to engineers, designing strengthened materials.

    Unlike bones, which are made partly of living cells, human teeth are not able to repair damage.

    Their bulk is made of dentine, a bonelike material consisting of mineral nanoparticles.

    Scientists found mineral particles in dentine (shown above) are pre-compressed so that internal stresses stop teeth cracking

    Scientists found mineral particles in dentine (shown above) are pre-compressed so that internal stresses stop teeth cracking

    These mineral nanoparticles are embedded in collagen protein fibres.

    These fibres are found in every tooth and lie in layers to make teeth tough and damage resistant.

    To understand more, experts conducted stress experiments on teeth and analysed the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles using cutting edge imaging technology.

    They found that when the tiny collagen fibres shrink, attached mineral particles become increasingly compressed.

    ‘Our group was able to use changes in humidity to demonstrate how stress appears in the mineral in the collagen fibres,’ Dr Paul Zaslansky explained.

    ‘The compressed state helps to prevents cracks from developing and we found that compression takes place in such a way that cracks cannot easily reach the tooth inner parts, which could damage the sensitive pulp.

    ‘In this manner, compression stress helps to prevent cracks from rushing through the tooth.’

    They also discovered that dentine can be weakened if it’s heated and mineral-protein links are destroyed.

    This causes them to think that the balance of stresses between the particles and the protein is important for the extended survival of teeth in the mouth.

    The results of the study may explain why artificial teeth don’t usually work as well as natural teeth do.

    Jean-Baptiste Forien said artificial teeth are too passive because they lack the mechanisms found in the natural tooth structures, so they can’t withstand forces as well as natural teeth.

    Dr Zaslansky hopes the study will lead to tougher ceramic structures that could be used in artificial teeth.

     

     

    Source:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3119944/The-secret-strong-teeth-revealed-Nanostructures-dentine-make-pearly-whites-crack-resistant.html

     

  • Study finds dental implants result in better quality of life for osteoporotic women

    With age, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are at greater risk of losing their teeth. But what treatment for tooth loss provides women with the highest degree of satisfaction in their work and social lives?

    A new study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers suggests dental implants may be the best route to take, according to Leena Palomo, associate professor of periodontics and corresponding author of “Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women.”

    Their findings were reported in the Journal of International Dentistry . The research is part of a series of studies analyzing dental outcomes for with osteoporosis.

    In one of the first studies to examine quality of life after treatment to replace missing in osteoporotic women, the researchers surveyed 237 women about their with replacement teeth and how it improved their lives at work and in social situations. The 23-question survey rated satisfaction with their work, health, emotional and sexual aspects of their lives.

    Participants were from the Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Wellness Collaboration, which is part of a database of health information about 900 women with osteoporosis.

    Osteoporotic women with one or more adjacent teeth missing (excluding or third molars) were chosen for the study. The women had restoration work done that included implants (64 women), fixed partial denture, which is a false tooth cemented to crowns of two teeth (60), a removal denture, better known as false teeth (47), or had no restoration work done (66).

    Women with dental implants reported a higher overall satisfaction with their lives, said Christine DeBaz, a third-year Case Western Reserve dental student. She was lead researcher on the project and personally interviewed each participant.

    Fixed dentures scored next highest in satisfaction, followed by false teeth and, finally, women with no .

    Women with also reported the highest satisfaction in emotional and sexual areas, while those without restorations scored the lowest in those two areas.

    As health professions move to a patient-centered form of delivering dental service, understanding the patient’s outcomes for satisfaction of the treatment’s esthetics is as important as chewing function, DeBaz said.

    “We need hard data to drive our decision-making about which is best for the patient,” Palomo said.With age, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are at greater risk of losing their teeth. But what treatment for tooth loss provides women with the highest degree of satisfaction in their work and social lives?

    A new study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers suggests dental implants may be the best route to take, according to Leena Palomo, associate professor of periodontics and corresponding author of “Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women.”

    Their findings were reported in the Journal of International Dentistry . The research is part of a series of studies analyzing dental outcomes for with osteoporosis.

    In one of the first studies to examine quality of life after treatment to replace missing in osteoporotic women, the researchers surveyed 237 women about their with replacement teeth and how it improved their lives at work and in social situations. The 23-question survey rated satisfaction with their work, health, emotional and sexual aspects of their lives.

    Participants were from the Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Wellness Collaboration, which is part of a database of health information about 900 women with osteoporosis.

    Osteoporotic women with one or more adjacent teeth missing (excluding or third molars) were chosen for the study. The women had restoration work done that included implants (64 women), fixed partial denture, which is a false tooth cemented to crowns of two teeth (60), a removal denture, better known as false teeth (47), or had no restoration work done (66).

    Women with dental implants reported a higher overall satisfaction with their lives, said Christine DeBaz, a third-year Case Western Reserve dental student. She was lead researcher on the project and personally interviewed each participant.

    Fixed dentures scored next highest in satisfaction, followed by false teeth and, finally, women with no .

    Women with also reported the highest satisfaction in emotional and sexual areas, while those without restorations scored the lowest in those two areas.

    As health professions move to a patient-centered form of delivering dental service, understanding the patient’s outcomes for satisfaction of the treatment’s esthetics is as important as chewing function, DeBaz said.

    “We need hard data to drive our decision-making about which is best for the patient,” Palomo said.

  • Have Kids? Check out What’s New in the World of Pediatric Dentistry!

    One of Houstonia ’s Top Dentists tells us about some of the latest and greatest advances for young patients.

    (Source: http://www.houstoniamag.com, By Yasmine Saqer )

    Girl with picture of teeth over her mouth

    WHEN IT COMES TO KIDS, oral health is a persistent problem. But advances in tools and procedures for the fight against dental disease, of which tooth decay is the most common manifestation, are being made all the time. We asked one of Houstonia’s top dentists, Dr. Pamela Clark of Pearland Pediatrics, to tell us about some of the latest and greatest advances for young patients.

    Zirconium crowns

    It turns out that patients aren’t the only ones who hate those bulky silver crowns. Dentists prefer natural and less obvious-looking ones too. “Zirconium crowns are full white crowns that are more aesthetic than silver crowns and they allow us to offer choices to patients’ parents.” They can also be used on deeply decayed or deformed baby teeth.

    Fluoride varnish

    A top-flight preventive measure in the fight against cavities and tooth decay, this is typically applied following teeth cleaning, and for those with compromised or sensitive teeth. Clark finds fluoride varnish to be more beneficial and effective than foam or gel fluoride, the ease of application making it a more suitable choice for children. “Due to its characteristics, patients are able to eat and drink immediately following the application.”

    Isolite

    For children (and adults) who struggle to keep their mouths open during dental procedures, this tool can be a big help. Designed with a comfortable block to keep the patient’s mouth open, an isolating component to keep the tongue safely away from the treatment area and with light and suction capabilities, Isolite is a boon to both patient and dentist. “The Isolite aids in our office providing high-quality dentistry in a comfortable, compassionate, kid-friendly environment.”

    Intra-oral cameras

    To give her young patients and their parents a better understanding of dental care, Clark uses an intra-oral camera that produces real-time images of patients’ mouths. “Pictures are taken every day of poor oral hygiene, decay and pathology for educational purposes.”

    Soft-tissue laser

    A valuable tool for minor surgical procedures, particularly in newborns. “This device has enabled our office to provide a helpful service to many nursing mothers by offering a way to perform frenectomies on babies [removal of excess tissue in the mouth] that are having difficulty with nursing. Once a baby’s short frenum is relieved, they are able to nurse more productively, which is normally more comfortable for the mother.”

  • These People Tried to Perform Dentistry on Themselves and It Didn’t Go Well

  • Check out these DENTAL MYTHS DEBUNKED

    FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) —

    There are lots of myths when it comes to your teeth. How much do you know? When it comes to teeth, there’s the good, the bad and the ugly.

    Larry Lieberman, DDS, from General, Cosmetic, and Laser Dentistry in Palm Harbor, Florida says at one point or another, most of us will have a dental problem.

    “Periodontal disease affects over 85 percent of the population. That’s a really big deal,” Lieberman told ABC30.

    One way to avoid being part of that statistic: don’t believe teeth myths. The first, you should use a hard bristle brush.

    “Leave the hard toothbrush for cleaning the jewelry, and the soft toothbrush for cleaning the teeth,” Lieberman told ABC30.

    Another myth is that everyone should use a whitening toothpaste.

    “We find that people that come in that use a lot of whitening toothpaste have more sensitivity,” Lieberman told ABC30.

    Stick with a basic paste. Another fallacy is that chewing on ice is harmless.

    Lieberman told ABC30, “We see a lot of people that you know bite down on things they shouldn’t. We see people who really do open up beer bottles with their teeth.”

    Other common myths, is that aspirin next to a tooth will help with a toothache. It can actually burn gum tissue! Another is that all fillings will need to be replaced. It depends on your oral hygiene. And babies can’t get cavities, well they sure can and the cavities can even spread!

    One more myth is that kids get way more cavities than adults. Thanks to fluoride in tap water, decay in school-aged children has been cut in half in the last 20 years. However, dentists are seeing an increase in cavities in older adults because of medicines that dry out the mouth. They reduce saliva, which protects the teeth.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Source:

    http://abc30.com/health/open-wide-dental-myths-debunked/757559/

  • Why are these 107 dancing Rutgers dentists-to-be so ‘Happy’? See why!

     

     

    While most people aren’t happy to have to go to the dentist, that doesn’t mean dentists aren’t happy people.

    The 107 newly-minted dentists to graduate from Rutgers School of Dental Medicine celebrated the completion of this portion of their studies with a six-minute video set to Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” and Bruno Mars’ “Uptown Funk.”

    During their recent commencement ceremony, held at NJPAC in Newark, Kim Fenesy, senior associate dean for academic affairs, described the class:

    • Sixty percent are their family’s first generation of doctors and 9 percent are the first generation in the family to go to college.

    • For more than half, English is their family’s second language.

    • Class members range in age from mid-twenties to mid-forties.

    • Graduating students from the Internationally Trained DMD program came from twelve different nations: Egypt, India, Iraq, Israel, South Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Pakistan, Peru, the Philippines, Russian Federation and the Ukraine.

    Here they are looking slightly more conventional: